New York Noise

After over two years of work, we are glad to say that the final report for our project Wind Turbine-Related Noise in Western New York has been published.  Funded by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and co-produced with EPRI and Colden Corporation, the study presents a detailed and long-term look at noise levels and resident satisfaction near a modern, utility-scale wind power facility in Wyoming County, NY.

Wind Turbines

The findings of the study fill a gap in the available wind turbine noise research specific to New York State, and include a separate Syracuse University policy paper with specific and actionable advice for a non-technical public policy audience.  Both the Final Report (13-03) and the Policy Paper (13-03b) can be found at the NYSERDA R&D site, and we plan to present the project at the Wind Turbine Noise 2013 conference this August in Denver, Colorado.

MakeMusicNewYork

Today is MakeMusicNewYork, a FREE live music celebration on the longest day of the year! check it out….

mmny-summer-2016

 

Keep it quiet

The New York Times’ City Room Blog is putting together a presentation of New Yorkers’ favorite quiet oases, and they’re looking for suggestions.  Public places submitted to the blog’s interactive map will be considered for the piece later this spring.  Of course, your favorite quiet place may not stay that way once it’s discovered by eight million New Yorkers (and our 50 million annual tourists), so you may want to keep your favorite quiet place, well, quiet!

Don’t don’t honk

In what some might some might take as an admission of defeat (or at least a concession to reality), the New York City Department of Transportation has begun removing each and every “Don’t Honk” road sign from the city streets.  According to the New York Times, “the move is part of an effort to declutter the streets of often ignored signs.”   The signs also give the impression that unneeded honks were only a violation where the signage was installed; with or without a sign, unnecessary honking remains illegal throughout the city with fines starting at $350.

Don't Honk Sign

Enforcement is another matter; last year the NYPD issued only 206 summonses.  Most New Yorkers could count that many car horns in a day, if they were paying attention to them—of course, for most New Yorkers, ignoring the din of constant honking is a quickly learned survival skill.

A new record

Putting a new spin on the long-playing vinyl record, an editor at Instructables has devised a new method for producing LP records using a rapid prototyping “3D printer”.  Working directly from a digital audio file, Amanda Ghassaei uses the waveform profile to create a 3D computer model of the familiar LP groove, which is then built up in physical form by a UV-cured resin printer.

Despite the cutting-edge 16-micron resolution of the printer, the end result is rather crude, with a frequency response and audio quality as yet far beneath a typical analog vinyl record.  The all-digital noise introduced by the discrete print (in time, aliasing, and in amplitude, quantization) is also harsh compared with the traditional “warm” analog distortion sought after by vinyl enthusiasts and audiophiles.  Even so, one could foresee a niche market for one-off, just-in-time pressing of records to keep alive long out-of-print material (or new material that might be in limited demand).  Even though this can be accomplished with .mp3 files or CD-R discs, sometimes there’s simply nothing like setting needle to vinyl!

[via Wired]

Safe and sound

We are glad to report that our office is reopen and fully functional, after the extended power outage caused by Hurricane Sandy on October 29. We would like to wish all of our clients, colleagues, and friends a speedy and safe recovery from the hurricane and its lingering effects.